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Centerstone Breaks Ground on State-of-the-Art Outpatient Behavioral Health Campus and Facility

New Dede Wallace Campus to reinvigorate a 90-year legacy of mental healthcare in Middle Tennessee

Nashville, Tenn. – Centerstone, Tennessee’s leading not-for-profit provider of community- based mental health and addiction services, broke ground Monday, October 1, on a new outpatient facility located on the organization’s Dede Wallace Campus at 2400 White Avenue in Nashville. The new outpatient facility continues a long-standing commitment to mental healthcare in Middle Tennessee that began with the Nashville Junior League’s creation of the Home for Crippled Children in 1923.

The groundbreaking was celebrated by Centerstone of Tennessee CEO Dr. Bob Vero, as well as Centerstone of Tennessee Board Chair Janet Ayers, Centerstone Foundation CEO Linda Garceau, Centerstone of America CEO David Guth and many other friends, supporters and representatives from the Centerstone Board of Directors.

“The groundbreaking on our Dede Wallace Campus is an exciting milestone for Centerstone,” said Dr. Vero. “This new facility will allow us to expand our outreach and services to even more children and adults in this community, continue a legacy of mental healthcare that has existed on this site for nearly a century and advance our mission of preventing and curing mental illness and addiction.”

The $6 million, 18,090 square-foot facility – designed by InForm Smallwood + Nickle, LLC of Nashville and being built by Orion Building Corporation – will serve children, adults and older adults in Nashville and surrounding areas. Features of the new building include:

  • Dual specialty clinics in one location: one for children and families, another for adults and older adults
  • 37 clinician offices for counselors, psychiatrists and nurses
  • Convenient, accessible location
  • Space for specialty programs
  • Group therapy and play therapy areas
  • Bright, open waiting rooms with large windows
  • Garden areas with bricks from the original building serving as pavers to outline the old facility’s footprint

With the groundbreaking of the new facility, Centerstone and its supporters are reminded of the legacy that began in 1923 when Nashville’s Junior League established a nine-bed facility at 9th and Monroe called the Home for Crippled Children to serve children with polio and mental illness. As demand for the Home’s services increased, the Junior League purchased land and moved to White Avenue, opening the doors to the new, expanded Home in 1930.

The White Avenue campus expanded in 1956 with the opening of Mental Health Guidance Center, which is located in a building Centerstone still occupies. In 1970, the campus’ evolution continued with the Home for Crippled Children transitioning into offices for the Regional Intervention Program and the Mental Health Guidance Center being re-named the Dede Wallace Center in honor of mental health advocate and devoted Junior League volunteer Louise “Dede” Bullard Wallace who died in 1969.

Tennessee Board of Directors Members and friends at the Dede Wallace Campus groundbreaking

Tennessee Board of Directors Members and friends at the Dede Wallace Campus groundbreaking, from left to right: David Guth, CEO of Centerstone of America; Sperry Bell Stadler, ABF Freight System; Connie Summers, community and mental healthcare leader; Lee Ann Ingram, Immediate Past Board Chair and community leader; Dr. Richard Baxter, professor and consultant, Knowledge Elements; Janet Ayers, Chair of the Board and President of the Ayers Foundation; Deborah Taylor Tate, former Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission; Jim Sweeten, retired CPA; Brenda Corbin, community leader; Dr. Carmen Reagan, Secretary of the Board and retired higher education professional; Lavinia Johnston, vice president of the Tucker Foundation, Johnston Southern Co.; Christa N. Holleman, retired real estate professional; Albert Menefee III, owner and operator, Beech Creek Farm; Kelly Crockett, community leader; Joan Sivley, community leader; Steven Saliba, owner, Saliba Construction Company; Dana Oman, community leader; Mark Faulkner, Vice Chair of the Board and President of Vireo Systems, Inc.; and Dr. Bob Vero, CEO of Centerstone of Tennessee.



From left to right: David Guth, CEO of Centerstone of America; Lee Ann Ingram, Immediate Past Centerstone of Tennessee Board Chair and community leader; Jason Hutcherson, representative from InForm Smallwood+Nickle, LLC; Janet Ayers, Chair of the Centerstone of Tennessee Board and President of the Ayers Foundation; Dr. Bob Vero, CEO of Centerstone of Tennessee; and Linda Garceau, CEO of the Centerstone Foundation.

Front rendering 24 x 36

Front rendering 24 x 36, courtesy of InForm Smallwood+Nickle, LLC

Rear rendering 24 x 36

Rear rendering 24 x 36, courtesy of InForm Smallwood+Nickle, LLC

About Centerstone

Centerstone, a not-for-profit organization, has provided a wide range of mental health and addiction services to people of all ages for more than 55 years. Through more than 50 facilities and 160 partnership locations across Middle Tennessee, Centerstone serves 50,000 children, adolescents, adults and seniors each year. Centerstone is accredited by The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). For more information about Centerstone, please call 888-291-4357 or visit www.centerstone.org.