cstnprapp11.centerstone.lan

Centerstone Partners with Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee to Provide Post-Flood Crisis Management Services

Centerstone will lead training sessions with clergy and church staff to assist congregations affected by emotional toll of recent floods

Nashville, Tenn.—Centerstone, a not-for-profit organization providing a wide range of mental health and addiction services, today announced it is partnering with the Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee to provide training for clergy, church staff members and church volunteers who are helping their congregation members overcome the emotional and mental impacts of historic floods in Middle Tennessee.

“Pastoral care in a disaster situation is a challenge, “said Rt. Rev. John C. Bauerschmidt, Bishop of Tennessee. “Even in a community with people who are not directly affected, there are stresses and strains that may not be expected. Our community has been profoundly affected by the flood of 2010, and I am glad that we are helping to equip our clergy and others with the tools they will need in this changed pastoral environment.”

Bishop Bauerschmidt who previously led a parish in Covington, La., was uniquely aware of the emotional toll of Hurricane Katrina. He approached Centerstone after the Tennessee floods and asked the mental health provider to host training workshops with local congregation leaders.

Centerstone Crisis Management experts will lead training sessions in which Episcopal leaders will learn how to better recognize the warning signs and symptoms of mental health issues in their congregations, and assist them in the recovery process. Topics discussed will include an overview of the psychological impact of disasters, short and long-term recovery, spiritual care and pastoral roles in crisis, post traumatic stress, compassion fatigue and more.

“Centerstone is pleased to work with local Episcopal churches to help them bring healing and recovery to their members, many of whom were severely impacted by the floods,” said Bob Vero, EdD, CEO of Centerstone. “The recent floods have left deep emotional scars on many people in our community, and we are continuing to work with local organizations to help them communicate with their members and overcome the long-term mental health effects of this disaster.”

Sessions will be led by Susan Gillpatrick, MEd, Centerstone Crisis Management Specialist, on June 30 at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Nashville. If your church or organization is interested in working with a Centerstone crisis expert, please call 615-460-4481.

About Centerstone

Centerstone, a not-for-profit organization, has provided a wide range of mental health and addiction services to people of all ages for more than 50 years. Through more than 60 facilities and 170 partnership locations across Middle Tennessee, Centerstone serves more than 50,000 children, adolescents, adults and seniors each year. Centerstone is accredited by The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). For more information about Centerstone, please call 888-291-4357 or explore our website: www.centerstone.org.

###