The Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic is available during COVID-19 | Centerstone Clarksville TN.
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A recent study released by Cohen Veteran’s Network (CVN) shows Americans are concerned about their mental health during this coronavirus pandemic.  With more than 90 percent of the U.S. population under some form of stay-at-home order, and physical distancing in place, the situation is beginning to have an impact on peoples’ state of mind and bringing mental health care to the forefront.  The Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic at Centerstone in Clarksville, Tenn. wants area veterans and military family members to know its behavioral health providers are on call to help them navigate these difficult times.

According to CVN’s COVID-19 Pulse Study, 58 percent of the 2,000 U.S. adults surveyed are concerned about their mental health because of social distancing. Two-thirds reported feeling anxious; half cite feeling lonely or isolated and are having trouble sleeping due to the pandemic.  Additionally, 80 percent of respondents said they’re also worried people who need mental health services won’t be able to get help.

Lisa Eggebeen, regional director of the Cohen Clinic at Centerstone said, “We are all facing this crisis and should never feel alone, but for some military families this pandemic is causing additional unique challenges such as cancelled welcome home ceremonies, delayed redeployments, travel restrictions, duty station changes and much more.  This population has earned our help and we are here to provide it.”

The Cohen Clinic at Centerstone, located at 775 Weatherly Drive, may have temporarily closed its physical doors due to COVID-19 response guidelines, but staff continue to remain ready for business. Already equipped with telehealth capabilities; intake, clinicians, case management and support staff transitioned quickly to offering services virtually and are now meeting with clients via video or phone wherever they are located.

“It’s amazing really,” Julie Adams, the clinic’s lead clinician who also facilitates the team’s weekly meeting now via Zoom, said.  “Clients who were once concerned that telehealth would not be as effective as in-person therapy are thriving in this new environment and are making great strides in treatment.  It’s been a seamless transition for our team and it’s wonderful to see our clients making the adjustment so well and still striving for back to better.”

The Cohen Clinic at Centerstone front desk staff play a vital role in the clinic’s conversion to telehealth.  They too are set up remotely and are available to book same-day appointments.

“Our hours are staying the same, just as if the clinic doors were open,” Office Manager, Lindsey Chantler said.  “We are here to support our military families through this difficult time and we’ve taken all the steps to ensure we do it well.”

This includes reinstating the clinic’s community room enrichment opportunities in a virtual setting.  At this time, staff members are identifying potential online classes, such as Arts for Hearts crafts events and a “learn to crochet” class.

“We really strive to be more than a mental health clinic,” Outreach Director, Meghan Williams said.  “One thing that has always made the Cohen Clinic at Centerstone unique is the passion our staff holds for supporting our military families. For us that means being a community hub for social interaction and encouraging relationships, now we’re simply searching for new ways to do that.”

For more information on the Cohen Clinic at Centerstone, visit www.centerstone.org/cohen or call 1-877-HOPE123.

 

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