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FIRST.IL

FIRST.IL is a specialized treatment program that helps individuals who have had a treated or untreated psychotic illness for no more than 18 months (eligible diagnoses are schizophrenia, schizoa ective disorder, schizophreniform disorder or other specified/unspecified schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorder). is program offers psychiatric care, individual counseling, supported employment/education, family psychoeducation and recovery support for improved quality of life.

Program Eligibility

While each person will be considered for FIRST.IL treatment services on an individual basis, FIRST.IL is most appropriate for individuals who:

  • Are between 14-40 years of age
  • Are diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, major depressive disorder with psychotic features, bipolar disorder with psychotic features, post-traumatic stress disorder or other psychotic disorders
  • Have experienced no more than 18 months of psychotic symptoms (treated or untreated)
  • Are willing to consent to participate in at least two treatment modalities that include counseling, psychiatric care, supported employment/education, family psychoeducation and recovery support

Program Benefits

  • Decreased severity of the illness
  • Less physical, mental, psychological, social and occupational disability
  • Lower risk of relapse
  • Reduced family disruption and distress
  • Reduced need for inpatient care
  • Lower health care costs

For more information about the program, call Centerstone at (618)713-1394 or email Barb Gossman.

The Regional Prevention Center in Kentucky

Centerstone Kentucky’s Regional Prevention Center is one of fourteen in the state that works to prevent and reduce substance misuse and suicide within our communities. The Regional Prevention Center (RPC) brings together adult and youth community volunteers with state and local policy makers, social service providers, educational staff, public health personnel, business and church leaders and law enforcement representatives. All are dedicated to promoting healthy lifestyles and preventing substance misuse and suicide.

The Regional Prevention Center offers trainings to staff and the general community. The trainings offered provide education and skills necessary for youth and adults to live healthy substance-free lives. By educating the community, we help reduce the incidence of mental illness, substance misuse and related stigmas.

Prevention Specialists Certified by the state of Kentucky and trained in the curriculum, facilitate the trainings. There is a cost to attend some of the trainings to cover materials.

For more information or general questions, contact the Centerstone Regional Prevention Center. Business hours for the Prevention Center are M-F, 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Available Trainings

A Healthy Journey for Two
“A Healthy Journey for Two” is a FREE two-hour class for women of all ages that covers how tobacco, alcohol and other drugs affect children during pregnancy and while breast-feeding. Pregnant attendees receive multiple chances to win free baby items throughout the class and receive a gift card at the completion of ONE class. Any pregnant woman can attend. Fathers are also encouraged to attend.

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIT)
A two-day intensive, interactive and practice-dominated course designed to help clinical, non-clinical caregivers and parents recognize and review risk, and intervene to prevent the immediate risk of suicide. After the training, ASIST participants are able to: discuss suicide with someone at risk. Identify risk alerts and develop related safe plans. List resources available to a person at risk. There is a cost to attend.

Early Intervention Program (EIP)
The Early Intervention Program is for adolescents, ages 13-20 who are at risk for, or who may already be experiencing, problems related to alcohol, tobacco or other drug use. The primary goal of EIP is to help youth and their families learn about the risks and consequences associated with alcohol and other drug use. Services include brief assessment, youth and parent education and support sessions, assistance in referring to other needed community resources, case management and follow-up. There is a $60 fee to attend.

Grassroots Community Programs and Services
The Prevention Division offers technical assistance and consultation to grassroots community groups in coalition-building and evidence-based environmental strategies for substance misuse and suicide prevention. Grassroots Community Programs and Services promotes healthy lifestyles and prevention of substance abuse among teens and adolescents.

Guiding Good Choices
This training program is for parents of children in grades 4-8, and can be provided at schools, churches and  other locations throughout the region. The program consists of five, two-hour sessions. Parents learn to  increase  their children’s family involvement and to  strengthen family  bonds; establish a family position on   drugs; teach skills needed by children and adolescents such as effective refusal; provide effective reinforcement and appropriate consequences; use tools to resolve family conflict; and effectively express and control anger.

Mental Health First Aid for Youth, Adults and Public Safety
Mental Health First Aid is an education program designed to improve participants’ knowledge and modify their attitudes and perceptions about mental health, substance misuse and related issues, including how to respond to individuals who are experiencing one or more acute mental health crises. Youth Mental Health First Aid is designed to teach adults who interact with youth. Adult Mental Health First Aid is designed to teach adults helping other adults. The Public Safety curriculum educates first responders. After completing the interactive 8-hour course and passing an examination, participants are certified for two years as a Mental Health First Aider.

Prime For Life (PFL)
PRIME For Life (PFL) is a motivational intervention used in group settings to prevent alcohol and drug problems or provide early intervention. PFL has been used primarily among court-referred impaired driving offenders, but has been adapted for use with military personnel, college students, middle and high school students and parents. Different versions of the program, ranging from 4.5 to 20 hours, with optional activities, are available as a guide for use with various populations.

Question, Persuade and Refer (QPR)
Question, Persuade and Refer (QPR) Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention is a 1-2 hour educational program designed to teach “gatekeepers” (parents, friends, neighbors, teachers, coaches, professionals and law enforcement) the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to respond. This brief educational program is designed to recognize and refer someone at risk of suicide.

Screening, Brief Intervention, refferal to treatment (SBIRT)
Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is an evidence-based practice used to identify, reduce, and prevent problematic use, misuse, and dependence on alcohol and illicit drugs.  SBIRT is a screening tool used by medical and mental health professionals both clinical and non-clinical. The SBIRT model can provide resources in the area of greatest need.  This hour and a half training helps: re-conceptualize how we understand substance use problems, re-define how we identify substance use problems, and re-design how we treat substance use problems.

Sources of Strength
Sources of Strength is an evidence-based, peer-led mental wellness program that has been shown to reduce a number of problems: substance misuse, bullying, violence and mental health crises (including suicidal thoughts and behaviors). This program uses the power of peer social networks to change cultures within a school or organization. Under the guidance of caring adult advisors, a diverse group of identified peer leaders develop messages and activities that promote hope, help and strength throughout the school and beyond.

Staying Connected with Your Teen
Staying Connected with Your Teen program shows parents of teens in grades 7-12 how to improve their family management practices and strengthen the bonds between them and their children, resulting in substance misuse prevention, violence prevention and positive character development. The program features five or six 60-90 minute sessions and provides step-by- step directions for holding family meetings and resolving conflicts. Each topic is covered in a simple, entertaining format so that all types of families can make the program work for them.

Wellness Initiative for Senior Education (WISE)
The Wellness Initiative for Senior Education (WISE) is a curriculum- based health promotion program that aims  to  help older adults increase their knowledge and  awareness of issues related to health and the aging process.  The six-lesson WISE curriculum is delivered by trained substance misuse prevention specialists at small-group sessions held weekly over a 6-week period. Each lesson lasts 2-3 hours.

Zero-Tolerance Under 21 DUI Program (ZT)
This specialized program provides services to young people ages 16 -20 who have been charged with state regulation KRS 189A.010(1)(e), with a Zero Tolerance under 21 DUI offense. Young adults must successfully complete all the recommendations as written in their court requirements. Parents are not required to be involved in the program if the young person is 18 or older. Topics covered in the education sessions include: Alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs’ effects on physical and mental health, legal aspects of alcohol and drug, drugs and driving impairment, and the advantages of choosing “no use.” There is a $200 fee to attend.

Pharmacy Services

On-site pharmacies are located in select clinics to help you get the medicine you need in a convenient location.

Our expert pharmacists are here to help make your visit as fast and easy as possible. Let us know any questions or concerns you may have about your medications, and we’ll be ready to assist you.

Stepping Stones

Stepping Stones, a program of Centerstone, provides transitional housing and supportive services to youth 16-20 years old who are experiencing homelessness. We provide a supportive community where young people experiencing homelessness can develop skills to live independently. We welcome youth regardless of sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, race, national origin, creed, religion or disability. We are located in Bloomington, Indiana.

Stepping Stones’ goal is to provide a supportive community that encourages young people to make decisions that positively affect their lives and prepare them for the future. Our program has two over arching components: transitional housing and independent living.

What We Offer

  • Transitional Housing
  • Independent Living
  • Emotional Assistance
  • Job Coaching
  • Life Steps
  • Financial Counseling
  • Educational Group Sessions
  • Health and Wellness
  • Health Care
  • Be Active!
  • Alternatives and Awareness

Transitional Housing

Our Semi-Independent Living Program is for youth between the ages of 16-20 who are experiencing homelessness. It is comprised of three two-bedroom, furnished apartments which house 12 residents by gender for up to two years. A new, fourth apartment houses Resident Assistants and a fifth apartment serves as our Community Center and administrative offices. It is the central hub where residents and program participants receive case management, have group and individual meetings, use the computer lab and are able to socialize with staff and friends. Our clustered housing provides a safe and supportive environment for residents to hone their skills so they can become self-sufficient. It is our goal to move residents into a permanent housing situation once they leave the program. In 2008, 100% of our residents obtained permanent housing.

Independent Living

Our independent living program serves youth in our housing program, former residents and other at-risk youth in the community. These programs and services are the essential skills youth need in order to achieve a successful transition into adulthood and become self-sufficient. We provide one-on-one and group coaching, and case management to help residents reach their self-identified, staff-assisted goals in a “Care Plan.”

Educational Assistance

We believe that one instrument for successful independent living is education. For those residents who have not obtained a high school diploma or GED equivalent, we require them to be enrolled in school during their time in our program. Of the 34 youth who have been in our program since 2005, 100% of those residents who had not graduated from school attended high school or a GED program. In collaboration with teachers, counselors and school administrators, we monitor their progress by reviewing progress reports, report cards and attendance to help ensure their success. In 2008, two former and one current residents graduated from high school!

For those who have already graduated, we provide ongoing encouragement and support to those interested in obtaining higher education. We also provide or coordinate tutoring as needed.

Job Coaching

Another essential instrument for success that is often a barrier for youth is employment. Residents are expected to be employed while in our housing program. This can be a challenge given their inexperience, youthfulness and, sometimes, poor work history; however, from the time they are looking for jobs and filling out applications to actual on-the-job coaching (if necessary), we provide them with assistance they need to be successful. In 2008, 100% of our residents obtained a job while in residency.

Life Steps

Our career exploration program is designed to help youth think about their future and how to reach their goals. In both group and individual sessions, residents complete a personal career plan and learn about various occupations. They develop job searching skills such as résumé writing, interview skills and professionalism, and they develop an awareness of their personal strengths and abilities.

Financial Counseling

In an attempt to educate and provide relevant experience to residents, while in the program, they are required to pay a portion of their housing expenses (e.g. rent, utilities, phone, etc). We couple the experience with monthly budgeting meetings to facilitate understanding of income vs. expense, need vs. want and to encourage them to live a fiscally responsible life.

Educational Group Sessions

Once a week, residents and staff come together for an evening of community, education and food. We provide a nutritious group meal that residents take turns preparing. Local organizations like Middle Way House, Ivy Tech, Positive Link and other speakers come help us focus on core topics such as drug awareness, conflict resolution and stress management. This experience also fosters a sense of community and is a safe place for our residents to interact with their peers and staff.

Health & Wellness

Our holistic approach to personal health and wellness begins with preventative measures like accessing health professionals and understanding personal health to providing them with healthy lifestyle alternatives through physical recreational activities and alternatives to substance abuse. In addition to education, we provide our residents with fresh fruits and vegetables of their choosing on a biweekly basis.

Health Care

Many of our residents have not seen a health professional in years and have used emergency centers as their primary care. When a resident enters our program, we provide them with guidance to navigate the complicated medical systems as well as other governmental assistance programs. While they are in our program, we also have them create a personal Health Profile and meet with a Community Health Educator to discuss ways to improve their health. By the time they leave our program, it is our goal that they have taken over their own health coordination. Educating our youth on the available community resources and how to access them is an essential component of our program. This provides them with information and networks so that, when they leave the program, they have the resources to be self-sufficient.

Be Active!

By offering a wide variety of recreational activities like rock climbing and swimming, this program promotes regular, healthy physical activity and is open to high school-aged youth in the community. While rock climbing at Hoosier Heights, one resident noted that she “forgot how much fun it is to be active!”

Alternatives & Awareness (AA)

This program educates youth on the negative effects of drug use and gives them healthy alternatives. To ensure the success of our residents, we couple educational sessions and positive alternative activities with drug screenings when use is suspected. In a non-punitive setting, we provide our residents the supplemental counseling and encouragement to break negative habits.

 

Facts on Homelessness

Becoming a Resident

Waiver Services

Waiver Services provide support and assistance to persons with developmental disabilities to maximize their independence, self-advocacy and interaction with our community. The service array varies by individual waiver, but most waivers offer services such as Case Management, Behavior Supports, Supported Employment, Day Training and more

Waiver Programs include:

Supports for Community Living (SCL) provides an array of services supporting alternatives to institutional care for individuals with Developmental and/or Intellectual Disabilities.

Michelle P. Waiver (MPW) is a program providing an array of services as an alternative to institutional care for individuals with developmental disabilities. MPW allows individuals to remain in their homes with services and supports.

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) provides services and supports to adults with acquired brain injuries who are working to re-enter community life. Services are provided in community settings and focus on obtaining and monitoring needed services.

Western Day Treatment and Waller Therapeutic Program

Western Day Treatment and Waller Therapeutic Program are specialized therapeutic services within Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS).

Traditional Office-Based Services

Traditional Office-Based Services

  • Less intensive services for those clients who don’t need in-home or in-school counseling.
  • Clients and families come to our campus and see a therapist for ongoing issues or concerns.

TAYLRD (Transition Age Youth Launching Realized Dreams)

TAYLRD (Transition Age Youth Launching Realized Dreams) is a drop-in center for young people ages 16 – 25. TAYLRD is a place where young people can engage in a community environment, connect with mental health services and other resources, and contribute back to the larger community in their own strength-based ways. The environment is casual, offering free wi-fi, games, food, a pool table and other activities.

Targeted Case Management

Targeted Case Management is a geared toward identifying and linking resources and supportive services to individuals with Severe Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders.

Staying Connected with Your Teen

Staying Connected with Your Teen shows parents of teens practical ways to set family standards and take an active interest in their children.